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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

#Canadianism of the day: no guff

#Canadianism of the day: no guff = 1. a declaration of truthfulness. 2. an expression of mock surprise at a statement.

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4 comments:

  1. No guff is also a Kiwism... well I grew up with it in Dunedin (named after Edinburgh), New Zealand. :-) Michael Quinion has something interesting to say about its source: http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-guf1.htm

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    1. specifically in this usage? I know "guff" is used in all varieties of English to mean nonsense, but we couldn't find any evidence of "no guff" meaning "no kidding" outside Canada.

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  2. There is a radio proword "NO DUFF" that means "not a drill - real situation". Typically used to distinguish between simulation and real emergencies during training exercises. I think it is a NATO proword but it may be Canadian or Five Eyes.

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